BBMF Lancaster lands on 3 engines

The Battle of Britain Memorial Flight’s Lancaster had to return to RAF Coningsby on the weekend on only three of its four Rolls-Royce Merlin engines after the oil pressure on the no.4 engine started reading as high.

All photos kindly contributed to Defence of the Realm by Jim Knowles.


 

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If you have photographs or articles you wish to contribute to Defence of the Realm than you can email them to defencerealmyt@gmail.com. If successful you will of course be given full credit for your contribution and can even promote your own website/blog/social media account.

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Supermarine Spitfire Mk.IIa EB-G P7350 of the BBMF

A collection of images of Supermarine Spitfire Mk.IIa EB-G P7350 of the Battle of Britain Memorial Flight taken at RAF Coningsby in July 2016. Spitfire P7350 is the oldest airworthy Spitfire in the world and the only Spitfire still flying to have actually fought in the Battle of Britain.

All photos kindly contributed to Defence of the Realm by Jim Knowles.


Alongside Hawker Hurricane Mk.IIC LF363

Avro Lancaster PA474 KC-A “Thumper” of the BBMF

A collection of images of Avro Lancaster PA474 KC-A “Thumper” of the Battle of Britain Memorial Flight taken at RAF Coningsby in July 2016. The RAF BBMF Lancaster is currently painted to represent an aircraft which served with No.617 Squadron after the famous Dams Raid.

All photos kindly contributed to Defence of the Realm by Jim Knowles.


For more images of British military equipment and museums please visit the Galleries section or follow Defence of the Realm on Instagram

If you have photographs or articles you wish to contribute to Defence of the Realm than you can email them to defencerealmyt@gmail.com. If successful you will of course be given full credit for your contribution and can even promote your own website/blog/social media account.

Hawker Hurricane Mk.IIC LF363 JX-B of the BBMF

A collection of images of Hawker Hurricane Mk.IIC LF363 of the Battle of Britain Memorial Flight taken at RAF Coningsby in July 2016. LF363 was built at the Hawker factory at Langley near Slough. It first flew in January 1944 and is believed to be the last Hurricane to enter service with the RAF. The aircraft served with No 63 Squadron at Turnhouse, No 309 (Polish) Squadron at Drem, where it was used on shipping protection patrols off the east coast of Scotland, and No 26 Squadron with whom it flew naval artillery spotting and reconnaissance sorties before the end of the War (source BBMF).

All photos kindly contributed to Defence of the Realm by Jim Knowles.


Alongside Supermarine Spitfire Mk.IIa EB-G P7350

For more images of British military equipment and museums please visit the Galleries section or follow Defence of the Realm on Instagram

If you have photographs or articles you wish to contribute to Defence of the Realm than you can email them to defencerealmyt@gmail.com. If successful you will of course be given full credit for your contribution and can even promote your own website/blog/social media account.

Hawker Hurricane Mk.IIC PZ865 of the BBMF

A collection of images of Hawker Hurricane PZ865 of the Battle of Britain Memorial Flight taken in July 2016. The last Hurricane ever built, PZ865 rolled off the Hawker production line at Langley, Bucks in July 1944 and was given the appropriate inscription The Last of the Many on her port and starboard sides.

All photos kindly contributed to Defence of the Realm by Jim Knowles.


 

Spitfire flies under a bridge

Supermarine Spitfire IX MH434 flies under a bridge for a scene in the television series Piece of Cake. The series was made in 1988 and told the story of the fictional “Hornet Squadron” from the outbreak of war up until September 1940 at the culmination of the Battle of Britain.

The original book the series was based on saw the squadron flying Hurricanes but due to the lack of airworthy Hurricanes the series’ producers used Spitfires for filming. The majority of aircraft used were Spitfire IXs which were not available until a year after the Battle of Britain but they were painted in 1940s brown/green camouflage.

MH434 still flies today and is operated by the Old Flying Machine Company. You can view the aircraft’s official website by clicking here.

Spitfire bridge piece of cake

Royal Air Force Memorial Flight Official Club Autumn Journal 2015

Royal Air Force Memorial Flight Club Autumn Journal 2015 ii

The Royal Air Force Memorial Flight Club have published their Autumn Journal 2015. The beautifully produced publication aims to highlight the achievements and exploits of the famous Battle of Britain Memorial Flight and their inventory of historic World War II aircraft including one of only two Avro Lancaster bombers that remain airworthy anywhere in the world. The Royal Air Force Memorial Flight Club aims to support the Flight through raising awareness and funds to keep these historic aircraft in the air where they can best represent those brave men and women who built, flew and maintained them during the darkest days of World War II and beyond.

The Autumn Journal opens with a segment covering the standing down of Squadron Leader Dunc Mason as Officer Commanding of the Flight and the arrival of Squadron Leader Andy “Milli” Millikin as his successor. The Journal then goes in to a range of articles covering the story of the aircraft types the Flight operate. There is a fascinating article on the use of Hawker Hurricanes as night fighters and pays tribute to the Castle Bromwich factory where all four of the Flight’s Supermarine Spitfires were built.

The magazine is lavishly illustrated with beautiful and detailed photographs of the Flight in action during the recent air show season. There is also a detailed photo essay on the newest addition to the fleet, Spitfire LF.XVIe TE311, covering its story from restoration to flight.

This is an intimate look at the Battle of Britain Memorial Flight produced in high quality with the commitment one could expect from the supporters of one of the most public aspects of the Royal Air Force. If you would like to join the Royal Air Force Memorial Flight Club and receive your own copy of the Autumn Journal, then please visit the club’s page at www.memorialflightclub.com.

It costs just £25 (+ postage) to join and profits from the Club help to support the work the Battle of Britain Memorial Flight does. Thanks to Amy Sell at the Club for sending me this copy.

Do you have an event or charity you would like to promote on Defence of the Realm? If so then feel free to email the details to defencerealmyt@gmail.com.