Q&A with Battle of Britain veteran Group Captain Sir Hugh “Cocky” Dundas

In the second of the RAF Centre for Air Power Studies rarely-seen before historic ‘leadership’ themed videos, Battle of Britain legend Group Captain Sir Hugh ‘Cocky’ Dundas CBE DSO* DFC presents his thoughts on ‘Leadership in War’ followed by an informal question and answer session at an after-dinner speech given circa 1991 at the RAF Staff College, Bracknell.

Group Captain Sir Hugh Dundas joined the Royal Auxiliary Air Force as an acting-pilot officer in 1938 before being called up to active service upon the outbreak of the Second World War. Initially he served on 616 Squadron flying Supermarine Spitfire Mk.Is during the Battle of Britain fighting ‘hard and fiercely’ throughout. He went on to serve as a squadron commander and then subsequently as wing leader and had, by 1944, become one of the youngest Group Captains in the RAF at the age of just 24. In combat against the enemy he is credited with four aircraft destroyed while having shared in the destruction of another six as well as two probables.

He left the RAF in 1947 to pursue a successful career in the media. He has also published an autobiography, Flying Start: A Fighter Pilot’s War Years, describing his wartime experiences in great detail. In 1969 he was appointed Deputy Lieutenant for Surrey and in 1989 High Sheriff. Dundas married Enid Rosamond Lawrence in 1950 and together they had a son and two daughters.

Sir Hugh Dundas passed away on July 10th 1995.

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Baston in the Blitz 2015 Gallery

A collection of images taken at the Baston in the Blitz 2015 military show. All images were taken on August 1st 2015 and donated to Defence of the Realm by Andy Laing. If you would like to see more of his extensive military themed galleries then you can view and follow his Flickr account by clicking here.

Andy Laing writes extensively about the history of some of England’s air bases on his site Aviationtrails. If you have an interest in British and also American aviation history in the UK then I highly recommend you visit his site.


 

For more images of British military equipment and museums please visit the Galleries section or follow Defence of the Realm on Instagram

If you have photographs or articles you wish to contribute to Defence of the Realm than you can email them to defencerealmyt@gmail.com. If successful you will of course be given full credit for your contribution and can even promote your own website/blog/social media account.

Supermarine Spitfire Mk.IIa EB-G P7350 of the BBMF

A collection of images of Supermarine Spitfire Mk.IIa EB-G P7350 of the Battle of Britain Memorial Flight taken at RAF Coningsby in July 2016. Spitfire P7350 is the oldest airworthy Spitfire in the world and the only Spitfire still flying to have actually fought in the Battle of Britain.

All photos kindly contributed to Defence of the Realm by Jim Knowles.


Alongside Hawker Hurricane Mk.IIC LF363

Eurofighter Typhoon ZK349 GN-A Display

A collection of images showing Eurofighter Typhoon FGR.4 ZK349 adorned in special markings to celebrate the 75th anniversary of the Battle of Britain in 2015.

ZK349 has been painted in the colours of Flight Lieutenant Nicolson’s No.249 Squadron Hawker Hurricane Mk.I P3576/GN-A. On August 16th 1940, whilst attempting to bale out of the burning Hurricane after a battle with a number of Messerschmitts over Southampton, Nicolson saw a Bf 110 pass in front of his aircraft and immediately climbed back into his seat to fire on the German twin-engine fighter causing it to dive away and crash in to the ground. Only then did Nicolson bale out but not before sustaining significant injuries.

All photos kindly contributed to Defence of the Realm by Jim Knowles.


For more images of British military equipment and museums please visit the Galleries section or follow Defence of the Realm on Instagram

If you have photographs or articles you wish to contribute to Defence of the Realm than you can email them to defencerealmyt@gmail.com. If successful you will of course be given full credit for your contribution and can even promote your own website/blog/social media account.

Supermarine Spitfire Vb AB910 SH-F of the BBMF

A collection of images of Supermarine Spitfire Vb AB910 SH-F of the Battle of Britain Memorial Flight taken at RAF Coningsby in July 2016.

Built in 1941, Spitfire Mk Vb AB910 flew 143 operational missions in a remarkable wartime ‘career’ that spanned almost 3 years on ‘ops’. On 14 February 1945, whilst at Hibaldstow, ‘AB’ famously flew with a girl on the tail! LACW Margaret Horton, a WAAF ground-crew fitter, was sitting on the tail whilst the aircraft taxied out to the take-off point (as was standard practice in rough weather) without the pilot, Flt Lt Neil Cox DFC, realising her presence. He then took off with Margaret still there. The combination of her weight on the tail and her grip on the elevator very nearly had disastrous results but fortunately Neil was able to maintain control and one circuit later he landed with a considerably shaken WAAF still wrapped around the fin! (Source BBMF)

All photos kindly contributed to Defence of the Realm by Jim Knowles.


For more images of British military equipment and museums please visit the Galleries section or follow Defence of the Realm on Instagram

If you have photographs or articles you wish to contribute to Defence of the Realm than you can email them to defencerealmyt@gmail.com. If successful you will of course be given full credit for your contribution and can even promote your own website/blog/social media account.

Hawker Hurricane Mk.IIC LF363 JX-B of the BBMF

A collection of images of Hawker Hurricane Mk.IIC LF363 of the Battle of Britain Memorial Flight taken at RAF Coningsby in July 2016. LF363 was built at the Hawker factory at Langley near Slough. It first flew in January 1944 and is believed to be the last Hurricane to enter service with the RAF. The aircraft served with No 63 Squadron at Turnhouse, No 309 (Polish) Squadron at Drem, where it was used on shipping protection patrols off the east coast of Scotland, and No 26 Squadron with whom it flew naval artillery spotting and reconnaissance sorties before the end of the War (source BBMF).

All photos kindly contributed to Defence of the Realm by Jim Knowles.


Alongside Supermarine Spitfire Mk.IIa EB-G P7350

For more images of British military equipment and museums please visit the Galleries section or follow Defence of the Realm on Instagram

If you have photographs or articles you wish to contribute to Defence of the Realm than you can email them to defencerealmyt@gmail.com. If successful you will of course be given full credit for your contribution and can even promote your own website/blog/social media account.

80 Years Of A True Legend Of The Skies

K5054 Spitfire

March 5th 2016 marks an incredible 80 years since the first flight of the Supermarine Spitfire. The first prototype, K5054, designed by Reginald J. Mitchell, took off from Eastleigh Aerodrome on March 5th 1936 and while it may have looked a little rough around the edges it was unmistakably a Spit’ with its beautiful wing shape and smooth lines.

During World War II it was these stunning looks coupled with the throaty sound of its Rolls-Royce Merlin engines that helped raise the spirits of the British people as they found themselves facing a seemingly unstoppable Nazi war machine. It’s use as a propaganda machine was every bit as important as its use as a weapon of war. As well as serving the Royal Air Force, a carrier capable variant known as the Seafire was developed for the Royal Navy who continued to fly them on operations in the Korean War.

A number of events are taking place around the UK to celebrate the anniversary including a flypast of the site of the former Supermarine factory in Woolston where the aircraft were assembled by one of the numerous aircraft still flying today.

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More articles about the Spitfire on Defence of the Realm