The First Changing of the Queen’s Guard by the Royal Navy at Buckingham Palace

Royal Navy sailors have performed the Changing of the Guard outside Buckingham Palace for the first time in the ceremony’s 357-year history. Eighty-six sailors from 45 Royal Navy ships and establishments spent a month preparing ahead of the first ceremony on Sunday morning.

Representing many branches of the Royal Navy, the Senior Service’s traditional navy blue uniforms have replaced for a short period, the distinctive red tunics worn by the Foot Guards. Starting at Buckingham Palace in full show of the general public, they are also set to Mount Royal Guards at Windsor Castle, The Tower of London and St James’s Palace over the next few weeks.

“The last time the Navy had an operational role guarding the Queen was with Elizabeth the first, when Sir Walter Raleigh was appointed Captain of the Queen’s Guard in 1587,” said Captain of the Queen’s Guard, Lieutenant Commander Steve Elliot and Raleigh’s successor in the role. “So it goes back a little while.”

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Submarine Patrol (1943)

U-boats are evil. Submarines are good.

That’s the general impression the Royal Navy wanted to give the public during the war. The fact that Germany’s submarines were called U-boats helped distinguish them in propaganda films such as this even when tactics and operations by both sides differed only little. Nevertheless this is a fascinating – if somewhat scripted – account of RN submarine operations during the war.

Enjoy.

Canberra T.17 Video

Defence of the Realm’s invasion of YouTube continues. My second video to carry the banner of the site focuses on the Canberra T.17 at East Midlands Aerodrome. As well as photos this one includes a brief video I took of the inside of the cockpit.

PLEASE Remember I am still new at this and these videos are very basic and rusty but I am learning with each one. Hopefully in the future they will have CGI effects and explosions that Michael Bay would be proud of.

– Tony

Hedge-Hopping in World War II

Think the Panavia Tornado or Blackburn Buccaneer introduced the RAF to low level flying? Think again!

This remarkable footage from British Pathé news shows what it was like to fly at ultra-low level on a daylight raid over Holland in 1942. Aircraft include the Lockheed Ventura, the De Havilland Mossquito and the Douglas Boston. Flying low level helped the aircraft avoid German radar and improved their chances of hitting the target. It also made it harder for enemy aircraft to intercept them as they went in hugging the ground.

But of course low level flight has its own risks and as the narrator puts it;

Some of these planes returning to base have received hits while others have left bits of their fabric hanging on trees.