Video – First firings of Sea Ceptor missiles at sea

Video uploaded to the Ministry of Defence’s YouTube channel.

Today (04/09/17) the Defence Minister Harriett Baldwin announced the successful first firings of the Sea Ceptor air defence system.

In a visit to defence company MBDA’s site in Bristol, the Minister revealed the major milestone for the Royal Navy. HMS Argyll fired the Sea Ceptor missiles off the coast of Scotland earlier this Summer that will be used to protect the new aircraft carriers.

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Bofors Anti-Aircraft Gun

A collection of images of a Bofors anti-aircraft gun taken on the grounds at Caldicot Castle.

All photos were taken on May 6th 2017
Photos: Tony Wilkins


For more images of British military equipment and museums please visit the Galleries section or follow Defence of the Realm on Instagram

If you have photographs or articles you wish to contribute to Defence of the Realm than you can email them to defencerealmyt@gmail.com. If successful you will of course be given full credit for your contribution and can even promote your own website/blog/social media account.

Dragonfire research leads to laser melting mortar in seconds!

Early testing of laser capability at DSTL is already melting mortars. This research will feed into the Dragonfire programme – creating a laser capable of becoming an alternative to missiles – used for downing drones and cutting through the hulls of aircraft and armoured vehicles. The technology is not yet ready to deploy, with another 5 to 10 years of research on the cards – and it won’t be a thing of sleek, space age beauty, looking more like a fridge on a truck than a thing of science fiction! But while it might not look the part, its capability will be incredible.

British Army Bayonet Training Manual, 1916

The following extracts are taken from a US-produced reproduction of the British Army’s Bayonet Training Manual revised in 1916 to take in to consideration the nature of the fighting on the Western Front of World War I. With the US declaring war on Germany and the other Central Powers on January 9th 1917, they looked to take advantage of the lessons the Allied powers had learned in the previous two and a half years and apply them to their own troops.

Source: Archive.org.


Rolling Thunder Vietnam War battle re enactment at Fortress Wales 2016

The members of the Rolling Thunder, a UK-based living history group dedicated to the US soldiers who served in Vietnam re-enact a battle that took place in 1968 between the 1st Air Cavalry Division and the Viet Cong.

Not “British” but a fascinating demonstration nonetheless.

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12,000lb Tallboy bomb at Brooklands Museum

A collection of pictures of a 12,000lb Tallboy bomb on display at the Brooklands Museum in Surrey.

All photos were taken on April 5th 2016
Photos: Tony Wilkins


 

The Tallboy bomb was an earthquake bomb (an earthquake bomb is dropped from very high altitude to gain sufficient speed to penetrate and then explode deep underground, causing massive caverns or craters as well as generate severe shockwaves to descimate a large area) employed by the RAF during World War II. It was highly effective against hardened targets and its weight meant that it could be dropped from high altitudes with a higher degree of accuracy than smaller bombs. It was designed by the legendary engineer Barnes Wallis famous for developing the bouncing bomb of the Dambuster raids and was used in the later stages of the war.

Sitting on its trolley, the Vauxhall estate car parked behind it gives a good indication of the size of the weapon.

For more images of British military equipment and museums please visit the Galleries section or follow Defence of the Realm on Instagram

If you have photographs or articles you wish to contribute to Defence of the Realm than you can email them to defencerealmyt@gmail.com. If successful you will of course be given full credit for your contribution and can even promote your own website/blog/social media account.

Royal Marines guarding Trident replace SA80 rifles with C8 Colt Carbine

C8 Carbine Royal Marines FaslaneThe Royal Marines of 43 Commando Fleet Protection Group based at HMNB Clyde, Faslane in Scotland have started to receive the Canadian-manufactured rifle to replace the long standing but troubled SA80. Variants of the C8 Carbine have been used by British special forces units in the past but 43 Commando will be among the first British regular units to adopt the weapon.

British soldier army 2013 defence imagesLike the SA80 the C8 is chambered to fire the standard NATO 5.56mm round but is configured in a more traditional fashion rather than the the bullpup configuration of the SA80 (magazine positioned behind the trigger which made the SA80 a more compact weapon than previous generations of rifle such as the SLR). Despite this the C8 Carbine is still a relatively compact and ergonomic design with a reported high level of reliability.

The acquisition of the weapon for 43 Commando has been defended as reflecting the unit’s unique operating role which covers guarding Britain’s nuclear ballistic missile submarines in Faslane from terrorist and foreign intelligence operatives. The unit’s role has been made even more difficult with increasing protests against the nuclear deterrent from anti-nuclear activists and Scottish nationalists demanding the submarines’ removal from Scottish waters.

However, sources close to the Royal Marines have been quoted in The Independent as saying that the Royal Marines have been increasingly dissatisfied with the SA80; a claim not unique to the Royal Marines it must be noted. The SA80, which has become synonymous with the British armed forces in the past 25 years, has been marred by issues over reliability with it being described as a very high maintenance weapon. The SA80 has also received criticism for lacking range and stopping power especially when faced with insurgents in Afghanistan and Iraq armed with the ubiquitous 7.62mm AK-47. The source quoted in The Independent states that the C8 addresses all of these issues but the Royal Navy has hit back stating that the SA80 remains the weapon of choice for the infantry soldier across the British armed forces.